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12Oct/12Off

Webster’s Dad Died Yesterday

Remember Webster? It was ABC’s answer to NBC hit Diff’rent Strokes. Basically, both shows featured a cute black kid who will never physical grow up. He was non-threatening and popular with white folks.

Former Detroit Lions standout and National Football League great, Alex Karras, who later became a TV star, has died, ABC News has learned.

English: C13387-9, Nancy Reagan on the set of ...

English: C13387-9, Nancy Reagan on the set of television show “Different Strokes” with Conrad Bain, Gary Coleman, Todd Bridges, Dana Plato, and Mary Jo Cattlett. 3/9/83. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The 77-year-old former defensive tackle died at his home in Los Angeles, surrounded by his family, following recent kidney failure.

Karras was drafted by the Lions 10th overall in 1958, and he played for the team for his entire NFL career. Following his retirement from football in 1970 at the age of 35, Karras turned to acting, playing Mongo in the Mel Brooks movie “Blazing Saddles” and lovable dad George Papadapolis on the ABC series “Webster.”

After the news broke Tuesday that Karras had only a few days to live, his former team extended its sympathies to the All-Pro defensive lineman. Lions President Tom Lewand said in a statement released late Monday night that the “entire Detroit Lions family is deeply saddened to learn of the news regarding one of our all-time greats.

“Perhaps no player in Lions history attained as much success and notoriety for what he did after his playing days as Alex,” the statement read. “We know Alex first and foremost as one of the cornerstones to our Fearsome Foursome defensive line of the 1960s. Many others across the country came to know Alex as an accomplished actor and as an announcer during the early years of Monday Night Football.”

Karras quit acting in 1998, and in his later years, was plagued by numerous health problems. He was diagnosed with dementia, and is among the more than 3,000 players suing the NFL over the league’s treatment of head injuries.

His wife, Susan Clark, who also played his wife on “Webster,” told the Associated Press earlier this year that Karras had showed symptoms of dementia for years.

“This physical beating that he took as a football player has impacted his life, and therefore, it has impacted his family life,” Clark said. “He is interested in making the game of football safer and hoping that other families of retired players will have a healthier and happier retirement.”

Clark also said that Karras could no longer do some of the things he loved, including drive or remember how to prepare his favorite recipes. He joined the class action against the NFL six months ago.

Some of his former Lions teammates have shared their thoughts on Karras’ state.

“If there’s a miracle out there, you have to call upon it,” Hall-of-Fame linebacker Joe Schmidt told the Detroit Free Press. “It’s one of those things I’ve gone through with quite a few guys I played with have passed.”

There have been a number of high-profile cases of former NFL players who have serious health problems stemming from the lingering effects of head trauma endured in their playing days, that is said to have played a part in the suicides of Ray Easterling, Junior Seau and Dave Duerson.

The NFL has said it never purposefully misled the athletes, as the players allege, and is working toward a better understanding of concussions and how to protect players.

If a loved one was the victim of wrongful death that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.

19Sep/12Off

The NFL Hid Brain Injuries From Players

Have you ever wondered why football players wear helmets? The reason is because football is a risky sport that could result in serious brain injuries.

Several former professional football players are suing the NFL. There are more than 3,000 former NFL players who are suing the league for allegedly ignoring evidence of the link between concussions sustained while playing football and long-term brain injuries.

Project logo for the National Football League ...

Project logo for the National Football League wikiproject. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A master complaint combining dozens of existing lawsuits accusing the NFL of failing to provide information linking football-related head trauma to irreparable memory loss, brain damage, and other debilitating long-term health issues was filed in federal court in Philadelphia on Thursday.

The lawsuit names more than 3,000 plaintiffs, according to a legal source with direct knowledge of the situation, with approximately 2,500 players among that total, and the remainder being made up chiefly of players’ wives filing for loss of spousal support.

There were 86 lawsuits filed by more than 2,300 players in the last year, according to a league source, and a judge in Philadelphia was assigned to come up with one complaint.

The master complaint is not a class-action lawsuit, but rather is a standard part of multi-district litigation. Multidistrict litigation allows for the consolidation of lawsuits that have common factual issues, and allows for more efficient handling of pretrial issues, such as discovery requests and pre-trial motions.

The multidistrict litigation allows for separate trials and settlements for the plaintiffs in the different lawsuits, while a class-action lawsuit binds all members of the class to the result of a single trial or settlement. This would allow ex-players suffering to get different rulings or settlements than those who are asymptomatic, and give leeway for the legal system to treat each group of plaintiffs separately.

The court’s schedule provides the league with the opportunity to raise issues with the master complaint by June 19 and set August 19 as the date for the league to file a motion to dismiss the case.

If you or a loved one were the victim of an accident that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.

18Sep/12Off

Brain Injuries In The NFL

It happens on any given Sunday. Sometimes it happens on Monday or Thursday nights. Two teams of gridiron warriors take to the field and battle one another for glory and victory. It’s a dangerous sport, but someone has to do it.

Unfortunately, several former professional football players are suing the NFL. One of them is Mitch White, a former offensive tackle who was signed to the New Orleans Saints and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, but never actually played a regular season game. White is among the more than 3,000 former NFL players who are suing the league for allegedly ignoring evidence of the link between football-related concussions and long-term brain injury.

The 1893 Tulane University football team, the ...

The 1893 Tulane University football team, the first in school history (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Neuroscientists have only begun to research and understand the impact of concussions — even seemingly “minor” ones — on the brain, and we will be seeing a string of new studies on this subject in the coming months and years. Just this month, for example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that professional football players are three times more likely to die from neurodegenerative brain disorders — including ALS — than the general U.S. population.

The sport had an earlier violence-related crisis. At the turn of the 20th century, football was almost banned as a result of the appalling number of deaths that were occurring on the field — 18 in 1905 alone. Changes to the game, especially the introduction of the forward pass and new safety equipment, saved the sport.

Similar actions to reform football are being discussed today, but many neuroscientists remain skeptical that they will make the game any safer for the brain. Football’s future really lies in the attitudes of families who must weigh the risks and benefits of letting their sons play the game. If families — and their sons — increasingly conclude that the risks are not worth it, football will become as irrelevant as boxing.

And brain injuries aren’t the only problem that football players face. They could also be victims of paralysis. Earlier this month, former Tulane football player Devon Walker sustained a spinal cord injury when he collided with a teammate in a game against Tulsa. He may be paralyzed for the rest of his life.

If you or a loved one were the victim of an accident that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.

2Aug/12Off

Chargers’ Running Back in Minor Car Accident

A popular sports athlete has been involved in a minor collision while in the Sports Arena. San Diego Chargers running back Ryan Mathews received minor injuries on Monday, July 30 after being involved in a two-vehicle collision around midnight. Luckily no major injuries were acquired from the car accident.

English: Ryan Mathews, a player on the San Die...

English: Ryan Mathews, a player on the San Diego Chargers American football team. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

While driving down a road on his way to a team hotel, Mathews was going to the Interstate 8 at Sports Arena Boulevard when he lost control of his 2010 BMW. After losing control, his car drifted, causing him to turn the wheel which eventually made the BMW spin out. While his car spun out, that was when he hit another vehicle. The collision is what caused Mathews to have aches and minor pains the next day. The NFL player was taken to a hospital to be checked for any possible serious injuries.

The football star told reporters that he was only banged up “a little bit” at his elbow and was extremely sore the following day. He also told the press that he felt as if he had just played about four football games when he woke up the next morning.

The running back was suspected of driving too fast. However, neither alcohol nor drugs appeared to be involved in the accident. Fortunately, the driver in the other car was not hurt and did not receive any personal injury from the mishap.

The Southern Californian football team was off Monday but began training again on Tuesday afternoon. Mathews sat out the practice and just watched from the side lines. The coach, Norv Turner, said that Mathews has a “day to day” status because of his current condition.

Ryan Mathews joined the Chargers two years ago when he was the first draft pick in April of 2010. He has signed a five year contract with the NFL team.

Getting into a car accident can cause major whiplash and sometimes internal injuries that do not manifest or show up until days—sometimes even weeks—later. It was smart that Mathews went to the hospital following his car crash just to make sure he did not receive any injuries that can prevent him from playing football successfully.

It is important to not drive too fast and to be careful out on the road. It was lucky that neither Mathews nor the other driver was hurt when the BMW spun out. Besides Mathews professional football career, there are still other things to worry about—such as the safety of those in the road. If you have been involved in a car collision, make sure you go to the hospital and get checked up on a doctor. Your number one priority should be your health. And as soon as you are able, call a San Diego car accident attorney to consult about any personal injury you may have gotten as a result of the crash impact. Remember to drive safely and to fight for your rights.