kamagra amsterdam

Free Motorcycle Accident Attorneys Motorcycle Accident Lawyers That Do Not Charge A Fee On Lost Cases!

18Sep/12Off

Brain Injuries In The NFL

It happens on any given Sunday. Sometimes it happens on Monday or Thursday nights. Two teams of gridiron warriors take to the field and battle one another for glory and victory. It’s a dangerous sport, but someone has to do it.

Unfortunately, several former professional football players are suing the NFL. One of them is Mitch White, a former offensive tackle who was signed to the New Orleans Saints and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, but never actually played a regular season game. White is among the more than 3,000 former NFL players who are suing the league for allegedly ignoring evidence of the link between football-related concussions and long-term brain injury.

The 1893 Tulane University football team, the ...

The 1893 Tulane University football team, the first in school history (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Neuroscientists have only begun to research and understand the impact of concussions — even seemingly “minor” ones — on the brain, and we will be seeing a string of new studies on this subject in the coming months and years. Just this month, for example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that professional football players are three times more likely to die from neurodegenerative brain disorders — including ALS — than the general U.S. population.

The sport had an earlier violence-related crisis. At the turn of the 20th century, football was almost banned as a result of the appalling number of deaths that were occurring on the field — 18 in 1905 alone. Changes to the game, especially the introduction of the forward pass and new safety equipment, saved the sport.

Similar actions to reform football are being discussed today, but many neuroscientists remain skeptical that they will make the game any safer for the brain. Football’s future really lies in the attitudes of families who must weigh the risks and benefits of letting their sons play the game. If families — and their sons — increasingly conclude that the risks are not worth it, football will become as irrelevant as boxing.

And brain injuries aren’t the only problem that football players face. They could also be victims of paralysis. Earlier this month, former Tulane football player Devon Walker sustained a spinal cord injury when he collided with a teammate in a game against Tulsa. He may be paralyzed for the rest of his life.

If you or a loved one were the victim of an accident that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.

14Sep/12Off

Devon Walker’s Injury Lingers For Tulsa

Nearly a week ago, the life of Devon Walker, a defensive player for Tulane, changed forever. He broke his neck when he collided with a teammate in a game against Tulsa. To make matters worse, Tulane lost the game to Tulsa.

Alex Singleton rushed for 102 yards and three touchdowns to help lead the Tulsa Golden Hurricane to a 42-10 win over Conference USA opponent Tulane. The game was marked by a serious injury to Tulane safety Devon Walker at the end of the first half.

English: Oklahoma Sooners linebacker Ryan Reyn...

English: Oklahoma Sooners linebacker Ryan Reynolds tackles a Tulsa Golden Hurricane player during a 2009 game. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tulane scored first with a 49-yard field goal by Cairo Santos to take an early lead, but Tulsa quickly took control of the game.

Singleton scored his first touchdown of the game on a 2-yard run with 2:52 remaining in the first quarter, and then he scored again on a 1-yard run, just before the end of the quarter.

The Golden Hurricane extended the lead to 21-3, on a 74-yard touchdown pass completion from Cody Green to Thomas Roberson, and with 13:54 remaining in the second quarter.

Tulsa struck again on a 16-yard TD pass from Green to Jordan James with 8:58 remaining in the second quarter, and Tulsa took a 28-3 lead.

With 4:48 remaining before halftime, Tulsa’s Singleton scored his third TD of the first half on a 2-yard run.

Green completed 16-of-26 passes for 274 yards and two touchdowns.

On the last play of the first half, Walker was hit hard in the helmet by teammate Julius Warmsley’s helmet. Walker was knocked unconscious, and CPR was performed while he lay motionless on the field. Walker was breathing but unconscious when taken to St. Francis Hospital by ambulance. Tulane team physician Dr. Buddy Savoie said after the game that Walker suffered a cervical spine fracture.

In the third quarter Tulsa missed a 21-yard field goal, and both teams remained scoreless in that quarter.

In the fourth quarter, TU backup quarterback Kalen Henderson ran in from five yards out, capping a seven-play, 81 yard drive to make the score 42-3. The Hurricane tacked on a field goal by Daniel Schwarz with 4:26 left in the game.

Tulane scored its only touchdown of the game when quarterback Devin Powell connected with Ryan Grant for a 66-yard scoring play with 3:30 remaining, making the score 45-10, Tulsa.

Tulsa will play a nonconference opponent from the Southland Conference this week as the Golden Hurricane hosts Nicholls State.

If you or a loved one were the victim of an accident that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.

13Sep/12Off

Devon Walker’s Medical Expenses Are High

Last Saturday, the life of Devon Walker, a defensive back for Tulane, changed forever. He broke his neck when he collided with a teammate in a game against Tulsa. Now he faces the biggest challenge of his life.

The outpouring of support – financial and emotional – for injured Tulane football player Devon Walker came moments after Walker hit the ground in Tulsa last Saturday after sustaining a neck-breaking accidental blow from a teammate.

Tulane players warming up for a game against Texas

Tulane players warming up for a game against Texas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A flurry of tweets flickered across cell phones and iPads after the collision. The concerned social networking increased as Walker remained motionless for more than 20 minutes as CPR was performed in front of a stunned stadium.

By that night, when it was clear Walker had sustained a fractured cervical spine (broken neck) and required surgery, Tulane officials thought about how to harness all the concerned support.

Sunday night a page on the Tulane’s website went up and garnered more than 80,000 hits, compared to the approximate 30,000 hits the university’s website receives in a day.

Four days later, more than $40,000 has been raised off of more than 250 donations on Tulane’s website’s page for Devon Walker. Capital One Bank has set up an account for the family, which can be accessed through the website.

In addition to the site, people all over the nation have written cards, emails, and requested contact with Walker and his family. Even members of Eric LeGrand’s family have reached out. LeGrand is a former Rutgers football player who broke his neck in 2010.

The donations are needed for the family expenses – the athletic department’s health insurance policy and the NCAA’s policy is expected to cover Walker’s medical care now and throughout the course of his rehabilitation.

The Times-Picayune did a story in 1990 about three football players who had suffered spinal cord injuries on the football field in the 1989 season and all three of their medical expenses were close to $1 million a year.

Walker’s medical care should be covered, but the family’s costs to care and support him aren’t.

No one knows that more than former Penn State football player Adam Taliaferro, who broke his neck in a game at Ohio State in 2000 and was paralyzed for several months.

He said his parents – like Devon’s – were not at the game. But the university arranged travel for his father.

Tulane hopes to rally the well-wishing nation to ease any potential financial burden for the Walker family as well.

The Uptown campus’ students are engaged in the effort as well. Seniors Brad Girson and Jesse Schwartz, who started their own clothing line as sophomores, have designed a T-shirt and wristband bearing Walker’s name and jersey number. All net proceeds will be donated to Walker’s fund. A link to purchase shirts is up on Walker’s page on Tulane’s website.

If you or a loved one were the victim of an accident that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.

12Sep/12Off

Devon Walker Needs Eric LeGrand As A Mentor

Devon Walker and Eric LeGrand have a lot in common. Both of them are college football players who sustained spinal cord injuries during a game.

Karen LeGrand was hit with a rush of awful memories when she heard a Tulane player had been carted off the field with what turned out to be a spinal cord injury.

MetLife Stadium

MetLife Stadium (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Having gone through it with her son, Eric, she couldn’t help but think of Devon Walker’s mother, who was home in Louisiana when her son was injured during a game at Tulsa.

Walker was hurt in a head-on collision while trying to make a tackle Saturday. He underwent three hours of surgery the next day and was in stable condition Monday at a Tulsa hospital. The long-term prognosis is still not clear.

Inez Walker was back at home in New Orleans on Saturday. The game was televised there.

Eric LeGrand injured his spine in 2010 while making a tackle during a game against Army. He was paralyzed below the shoulders. Karen LeGrand, who lives in New Jersey, was at that game at MetLife Stadium. She said she quickly sensed something was very wrong when Eric didn’t immediately get up.

While she wasn’t able to be next to Eric while he was being attended to by trainers and doctors, she was able to get onto the field as he was being placed in an ambulance.

Karen LeGrand said she has reached out to the Walkers through Tulane and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation.

The Reeve Foundation raises money for research to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. It was founded by the late Christopher Reeve, who was paralyzed in an accident at an equestrian competition in 1995, and his wife, Dana.

Karen LeGrand said she wanted to get word to the Walkers that they were praying for Devon, and that she and Eric would make themselves available to help in any way they could. She hasn’t heard back from Inez Walker, but she’s not surprised.

Walker, his family and Tulane can expect plenty of support from Rutgers.

Scarlet Knights coach Kyle Flood said he left a phone message with Tulane coach Curtis Johnson, and Rutgers head athletic trainer David McCune similarly reached out to his counterpart with the Green Wave.

Spinal cord injuries are unpredictable by nature and the first few days can be especially difficult because there is so much uncertainty.

Eric LeGrand has come a long way since he was injured and doctors told Karen that he would likely spend the rest of his life breathing with the aid of ventilator.

Eric LeGrand now does physical therapy five days a week, takes college classes and works as a radio announcer on Rutgers games.

The LeGrands are also working with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation to start their own foundation.

If you or a loved one were the victim of a accident that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.

11Sep/12Off

Devon Walker Out Of Surgery

There is a strong possibility that Devon Walker may never walk again. Let’s hope that he doesn’t join the ranks of football players whose careers have been cut short because of paralysis. It happened to Darryl Stingley, who was a wide receiver for the New England Patriots and was paralyzed in a 1978 preseason game against the Oakland Raiders. More than 13 years later, Mike Utley, an offensive lineman for the Detroit Lions, was paralyzed during a game against the Minnesota Vikings. A year later, the same would happen to Dennis Byrd, a defensive tackle for the New York Jets. Byrd was paralyzed during a game against the Kansas City Chiefs. More recently, Kevin Everett, a tight end for the Buffalo Bills, was paralyzed in a 2007 game against the Denver Broncos.

Tulane senior defensive back Devon Walker is responsive following surgery on his fractured cervical vertebrae, but it’s too early to draw any conclusions about his progress.

English: The New England Patriots' offense on ...

English: The New England Patriots’ offense on the field against the New York Jets in a 2006-07 NFL Wild Card Playoff game. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The odds were about 100,000 to 1 that he’d suffer a spinal cord injury in a college game. Walker just happened to be the unlucky one.

It was the same with Darryl Stingley, Mike Utley and Dennis Byrd and other players whose names remind us of things we’d rather forget. We just accept them as the cost of doing football business and hope they can turn tragedy into inspiration.

Walker underwent surgery Sunday to stabilize his spine. He has some feeling in his extremities. As the swelling subsides in the next few days, doctors will find out how severe the nerve damage is.

What happened is not a mystery. Walker was zeroing in on a Tulsa runner. He arrived at the target the same time as a teammate. Walker’s helmet slammed into the helmet of defensive tackle Julius Warmsley.

Walker’s body went limp. Trainers and doctors ran to him. The stadium hushed. Players knelt and prayed. “Help is on the way,” Coach Curtis Johnson whispered to Walker.

Back home, a horrified mother and father watched on TV and wondered how quickly they could get to their son. The drama has been performed so many times before.

According to the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research, 295 high school, college, pro and sandlot football players suffered spinal cord injuries from 1977-2009.

Relatively speaking, guys like Utley and former Rutgers defensive tackle Eric LeGrand were lucky. They were hurt in high-profile games and had financial backstops to deal with the millions of dollars in medical and rehabilitation bills.

After a few heartfelt fundraisers, there’s not much more people can do. The high schoolers often end up scraping by on Medicaid and maybe get a plaque outside their old stadium.

About the only good news is we’ve come a long way since three college players died from injuries in 1905. Leather helmets have given way to things like the Head Impact Telemetry System, where padded sensors record the hits a player’s skull absorbs.

It’s used primarily to track concussions, though a high school player broke his neck while wearing the system a couple of years ago. Sensors showed his helmet sustained a 114 g-force blow. That was more than 30 times as much force Space Shuttle astronauts endure on takeoff.

But while it’s not 1905 anymore, all the technique and equipment refinements will never change the basic physics of football. When heads in motion collide, bad things happen. Then that all-too-familiar scene plays out.

That’s the equation we all deal with. We love the game, so we accept its collateral damage and move on. That’s better than dwelling on the reality.

A kid who wanted to be a doctor lies in an intensive care unit. He doesn’t know if he’ll ever move again. It’s a hell of a price to pay for business as usual.

If a loved one was the victim of an accident that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.

10Sep/12Off

Devon Walker May Never Walk Again

The curiously named Devon Walker may soon join the ranks of football players whose careers have been cut short because of paralysis. Two years ago, it happened to college football player Eric LeGrand. It has also occurred repeatedly in the NFL. Darryl Stingley, who was a wide receiver for the New England Patriots, was paralyzed in a 1978 preseason game against the Oakland Raiders. More than 13 years later, Mike Utley, an offensive lineman for the Detroit Lions, was paralyzed during a game against the Minnesota Vikings. A year later, the same would happen to Dennis Byrd, a defensive tackle for the New York Jets. Byrd was paralyzed during a game against the Kansas City Chiefs. More recently, Kevin Everett, a tight end for the Buffalo Bills, was paralyzed in a 2007 game against the Denver Broncos.

Out of all these players, the only ones who have been able to regain their ability to walk have been Byrd and Everett. The others are confined to wheelchairs.

Tulane University, New Orleans, in 1904. Gibso...

Tulane University, New Orleans, in 1904. Gibson Hall. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Loved ones and teammates of a Tulane University football player who fractured his spine while making a tackle will face an agonizing wait to learn how serious the injury is and whether it will leave him paralyzed.

Senior safety Devon Walker was in stable condition and recovering in an intensive-care unit after a three-hour surgery to stabilize his spine at St. Francis Hospital, said Dr. Greg Stewart, Tulane’s director of sports medicine.

“These kind of injuries take 24, 48, sometimes 72 hours to fully declare themselves,” Stewart said before the surgery. “We don’t know what the long-term implications and outcomes are going to be.”

Stewart said he was with Walker on the field, in the ambulance and at the hospital after the injury Saturday. He said Walker was put into a cervical collar and couldn’t see much of what was happening, so Stewart explained what was going on. Walker was talking with doctors as he was being treated, Stewart said.

Walker’s parents had traveled to Oklahoma to be with their son, and they were “doing as well as can be expected,” Stewart said.

“They’re like the rest of us — hopeful and prayerful.”

Stewart was back in New Orleans on Sunday, as were Walker’s teammates. He said Tulane’s athletic director and the football team’s trainer remained in Oklahoma with Walker.

Walker’s injury occurred on the final play of the first half, hours after Tulane opened the Conference USA portion of its schedule against Tulsa. Tulsa was leading 35-3 and facing a fourth-and-2 with the ball at the 33-yard line on Saturday when the Golden Hurricane called timeout. Tulane then called timeout.

When play resumed, Tulsa quarterback Cody Green tossed a short pass to Willie Carter, who caught it at about the 28, and turned upfield. He was tackled around the 17-yard line, with defensive tackle Julius Warmsley and Walker sandwiching him and apparently smashing their helmets together.

Medical personnel from both teams tended to Walker as he lay on the field. FOX Sports reported a hush went over the crowd at H.A. Chapman Stadium as Walker was attended to, and that several coaches were in tears as he was taken away in an ambulance. Spectators bowed their heads as someone on the field led the stadium in prayer.

Dr. Buddy Savoie said during a postgame news conference that Walker never completely lost consciousness and was breathing on his own.

“He was stable when we transported him,” Savoie said. “I do not think, based on the information we have, his life was ever in danger.”

Walker is a senior majoring in cell and molecular biology. His brother, Raynard, told The Associated Press on Saturday that their mother was watching the game on television when her son was injured.

Tulane head coach Curtis Johnson said after the 45-10 loss that while Walker was on the field, Johnson told Walker that he was praying for him and that help was on the way.

He said the mood among players was somber and called the day his most difficult ever.

“It was tremendous that they finished the game, as I thought about just saying ‘Hey look, let’s not do anything else. Let’s just get on the road and go.’”

If a loved one was the victim of a serious accident that was caused by negligence or some other form of reckless behavior, it is important that you contact a committed and dedicated personal injury lawyer to help you decide if you should file a lawsuit. A competent and reputable injury lawyer can help you receive the compensation you deserve for your pain and suffering.